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Multipoint Door Lock FAQs


Multipoint door locks became commonplace in the 1980’s when UPVC plastic conservatories and front doors were becoming a popular choice for residential home owners. Because of the flexible nature of the material, the multipoint lock was invented to provide additional security to the top and bottom of the door frame to prevent easy break ins.

Now you will commonly find a multipoint door lock on a UPVC plastic, composite and timber doors.

A multipoint door lock comprises of a centre gearbox with additional locking points running up the face of the door.

The Centre Gearbox
The gearbox is positioned at the centre of the faceplate and is where the operation of locking and unlocking is performed. Usually the gearbox will have a latch which retracts when a handle is operated, and a deadbolt which extends to lock the door as a key is turned or handle lifted. You may find some multipoint locks have a hook instead of a deadbolt.

The Faceplate
Faceplates come in varying widths and styles to suit different door profiles. Most common is a flat square ended faceplate but you can also get a radius rounded end or U-Track faceplate.

Additional Locking Points
There are a wide variety of different locking mechanisms all providing varying levels of security situated further up or down the faceplate away from the centre gearbox. Some multipoint door locks will only have 2 additional locking points whereas others will be classed as a higher level of security and can range up to 8 additional locking points.

Commonly found types of additional locking points are:

  • Rollers
  • Mushrooms
  • Hooks
  • Deadbolts
  • Pins
  • Wedges
  • Round bolts


Overall multipoint door locks are one of the most secure ways to lock your upvc plastic or composite timber door. The additional locking points provide extra security at points in the door that may usually be susceptible to break in and entry.

As with most locks, multipoint door locks offer differing levels of security from one another. This level of security will depend on a few things like the number of additional locking points, what those locking points are (rollers, mushrooms, hooks, deadbolts, pins etc), the operation of the lock, and the level of security of the accompanying handles and cylinder.

Here’s a list of the additional locking points and extra features available on some models:

Locking Points

  • Deadbolts
  • Rollers (compression only not security)
  • Mushrooms
  • Offset Cam
  • Sliders
  • Pin Deadbolt
  • Hook down
  • Hook up
  • Small Hook
  • Down hook above Pin
  • Up hook above pin
  • AV2
  • Hook and Deadbolts
  • Round Bolts
  • Poseidon
  • Thunderbolt

Extra Features

  • Shootbolts
  • Entry Guard
  • Lockout Facility
  • Holiday Lock


There are several ways that multipoint door locks can operate to change from a position of unlocked to locked and back again.

Lift Lever Operation
To Lock - Lifting the door handles upwards causes all the additional locking points to engage. Turn the key in the cylinder to lock the door.
To Open – Turn the key in the cylinder to unlock mechanism. Push the handles downwards to disengage and retract the locking points.

Nightlatch Locking
To Lock – On closing the door, the latch is automatically engaged. Lift the door handle upwards to engage the locking points. Turn the key in the cylinder clockwise to lock the door. From the outside the latch cannot be retracted by the handle only by the key.
To Open – Turn the key in the cylinder to unlock the door. Push the handles downwards to disengage and retract the locking points. A turn of the key will then retract the latch.

Key Wind
To Lock – On closing the door, the latch is automatically engaged. Turn the key in the cylinder 2 full rotations to engage all locking points into position.
To Open – Turn the key in the cylinder 2 full rotations to retract the locking points. The final turn of the key will then retract the latch.

Fastlocking
To Lock - Lifting the door handles upwards causes all the locking points to engage and lock. There is no need to turn the key.
To Open – Turn the key in the cylinder to unlock the door. Push the handles downwards to retract the locking points. A turn of the key will also retract the latch.

Automatic locking
To Lock – Closing door causes all the locking points to engage. Turn the key to deadlock the mechanism.
To Open – Turn the key in the cylinder to unlock the door. Push the handles downwards to retract the locking points. A turn of the key will also retract the latch.

Common signs that your multipoint door lock is faulty

  • The door handle drops or feels loose.
  • The locking points no longer engage or retract fully and show signs of wear.
  • The door handle is stiff, makes a grinding noise or you need to use excessive force to pull the lever down.
  • You need to use excessive force when turning the key to operate the deadbolt/hook.
  • One or more of the locking points fail to operate all together when you operate the handle.


Multipoint door locks for UPVC plastic doors
AGB multipoint door locks
Avantis multipoint door locks
Avocet multipoint door locks
Azbe multipoint door locks
Cego multipoint door locks
Elite multipoint door locks
ERA multipoint door locks
Fab n Fix multipoint door locks
Fix multipoint door locks
Fix Asgard multipoint door locks
Fuhr multipoint door locks
Fullex multipoint door locks
Gridlock multipoint door locks
GU multipoint door locks
GU Ferco multipoint door locks
Ingenious multipoint door locks
Kenrick multipoint door locks
KFV multipoint door locks
Lockmaster multipoint door locks
Maco multipoint door locks
Mila multipoint door locks
Millenco multipoint door locks
Roto multipoint door locks
Safeware multipoint door locks
Securistyle multipoint door locks
Sobinco multipoint door locks
Ucem multipoint door locks
Union multipoint door locks
Vitawin multipoint door locks
Wilka multipoint door locks
Winkhaus multipoint door locks
Yale multipoint door locks

Multipoint door locks for timber doors
Avantis multipoint locks for timber doors
Avocet multipoint locks for timber doors
Elite multipoint locks for timber doors
ERA multipoint locks for timber doors
Fuhr multipoint locks for timber doors
Fullex multipoint locks for timber doors
GU multipoint locks for timber doors
GU Ferco multipoint locks for timber doors
Lockmaster multipoint locks for timber doors
Maco multipoint locks for timber doors
Millenco multipoint locks for timber doors
Sobinco multipoint locks for timber doors
Winkhaus multipoint locks for timber doors
Yale multipoint locks for timber doors

Multipoint door locks for French doors
ERA Multipoint door locks for French doors

Multipoint Door Slave locks
Avantis Multipoint door slave locks
Elite Multipoint door slave locks
ERA Multipoint door slave locks
Fuhr Multipoint door slave locks
Fullex Multipoint door slave locks
GU Ferco Multipoint door slave locks
KFV Multipoint door slave locks
Lockmaster Multipoint door slave locks
Maco Multipoint door slave locks
Mila Multipoint door slave locks
Millenco Multipoint door slave locks
Roto Multipoint door slave locks
Winkhaus Multipoint door slave locks
Yale Multipoint door slave locks

Multipoint door locks for stable doors
KFV Multipoint Door Lock for Stable Doors
Fuhr Multipoint Door Lock for Stable Doors

Multipoint door lock operations
Lift Lever
Nightlatch Locking
Key wind
Fast Locking
Automatic locking


Multipoint door locks have a much longer faceplate than a mortice lock, approximately the length of the door profile. They can offer a superior level of security because of the additional locking points located near the top and bottom of the long faceplate as well as at the centre. Mortice locks only offer security at the central point of a solid timber door.

Commonly; multipoint locks will be operated by a euro cylinder key whereas a mortice lock traditionally are operated using a mortice key although you can now get ERA Vectis multipoint door locks that allow the use of a mortice key to operate the multipoint door lock.

Repair Multipoint Door Lock FAQs


A repair multipoint door lock is an adaptable or adjustable multipoint door lock that is designed to replace the majority of full-length multipoint door locks. Repair multipoint door locks can commonly be supplied in 3 pieces which enables them to be adapted to match the length and locking points position of the multipoint lock that needs replacing. At Duffells we supply our trade customers with a variety of repair multipoint door lock suitable for UPVC, timber and composite doors from well-known brands:

VERSA Repair multipoint door locks
ERA Repair multipoint door locks
Yale Repair multipoint door locks
Winkhaus Repair multipoint door locks


Repair multipoint door locks are available for UPVC, timber and composite doors. They are supplied in a box in kit form usually in 3 sections: the centre case with latch and deadbolt with the top locking and bottom sections containing the additional locking points.
The gearbox in the centre section will commonly have a smaller case size so that it fits in any pre-existing cavity left by the original multipoint door lock being replaced. The top and bottom extensions will need cutting down to match the position of the existing locking points.
The 3 sections are then fitted together using serrated connectors and depending on model will operate as either a lift lever or Nightlatch function.


View these instructional videos demonstrating how to install repair multipoint door locks.

VERSA V-MPL Repair Multipoint Door Lock

Yale Doormaster Adjustable Repair Multipoint Door Lock

Yale Doormaster Universal Repair Multipoint Door Lock


A repair multipoint door lock is closely priced to a standard full length multipoint door lock. A repair multipoint door lock will replace (in some cases) up to 99% of all multipoint door locks making it a popular choice for mobile locksmiths to keep them in their van stock for when emergency replacements are needed. Stocking repair multipoint door locks means the locksmith doesn’t need to make 2 visits to a job, or store a variety of full length multipoint door locks in their van. When using a repair multipoint door lock the replacement can be made in one visit.

Electronic Multipoint Door Locks FAQs


Electronic multipoint door locks are similar to standard multipoint door locks, but with addition of a motor or solenoid to operate the lock. When used as part of an access control system, an electronic multipoint lock offers the user the ability to open and close a door without using a key, or even a lever handle. The door, once unlocked, can simply be pushed or pulled open. When coupled with an electronic door operator, a totally contactless system of entry can be achieved. With a system of this type, users do not need to touch the door at all, as the unlocking, opening, closing and re locking of the door are all achieved electronically.

With electronic multipoint locks, the lock will automatically secure itself when the door is closed, as small triggers activate the locking points. Then, when the door is required to open, an electronic signal from the access control system activates either a motor or a solenoid. In the case of a solenoid, a clutch like mechanism in engaged which allows the user to operate the lock using a lever handle. But in the case of a motor, the operation of the lock itself is performed by the motor physically winding in the locking points, therefore requiring no physical interaction from the user.

The Winkhaus and GU electronic multipoint locks Duffells sell both use motors. The multipoint lock itself is just one part of a successful access control system, and other items such as a power supply, door loop, and a choice of access control hardware will be needed to design a system. Duffells can easily help you though creating a suitable system.

Winkhaus AV2 Autolocking Multipoint Door Lock

GU Secury Automatic Multipoint Door Lock


Not all multipoint door locks can be converted into electronic multipoint door locks. The additional parts needed to convert the multipoint door lock into an access control solution are only suited to specific multipoint door locks. At Duffells we stock electronic multipoint door locks from Winkhaus and GU.

Winkhaus Electronic Multipoint Door Locks

GU Electronic Multipoint Door Locks

Because of its access control capabilities and the additional parts needed; electronic multipoint door locks are priced higher than regular multipoint door locks.

Timber & Composite Door Kit FAQs


Timber doors can last up to 100 years if maintained regularly and protected. However, if they are often subjected to the elements they tend to warp and discolour after only a few years and will need a lot of upkeep and maintenance to keep them in good condition. Warped timber doors often mean the locks inside misalign with keeps, or worse break altogether.

Composite is now one of the most popular materials for front doors with homeowners. Composite doors are made from combining lots of pieces of different synthetic materials that when combined become stronger than their individual parts. They are often given a wood grain effect for style purposes because wood is a popular finish for front doors with homeowners. A composite door is just as easy to maintain as a UPVC door but has the added style benefits.

Composite doors will not rot, warp or discolour. The general life span of a composite door is 35 years and they have maximum energy efficiency – on average 10% thicker and help reduce heat loss and help toward heat retention. Multipoint door locks can be fitted to timber doors and composite doors.


Multipoint door locks for timber & composite doors commonly have the following features:

FACEPLATE
UPVC doors commonly have a faceplate width of 16mm, timber and composite doors tend to be thicker and therefore require a faceplate width upwards of 20mm. For UPVC doors, the multipoint door lock tends to have a square flat end to its faceplate. For timber doors, you may find the ends of the faceplate are either square or rounded to suit the doors indentation.

LOCKING POINTS
You will find most of the same locking points on a multipoint door lock for timber/composite as you would for a UPVC door. However, you won’t find roller or mushroom locking points on a multipoint lock for timber / composite doors. Rollers are used for compression and mushrooms are a locking device only found on multipoint door locks for UPVC doors.

BACKSET
UPVC doors tend to use multipoint door locks with a backset up to 45mm whereas locks for timber/composite doors usaully have a backset of 45mm and above.

At Duffells we stock multipoint door locks for timber doors from popular brands such as:

Avantis Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors
Avocet Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors
Elite Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors
ERA Products Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors
Fix Asgard Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors
Fuhr Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors
Fullex Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors
GU Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors
GU Ferco Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors
Lockmaster Multipoint door locks suitable for timber
Maco Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors
Sobinco Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors
Ucem Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors
Winkhaus Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors
Yale Multipoint door locks suitable for timber doors

French Door Lock Kits FAQs


French doors are a pair of outward opening doors commonly found towards the rear of domestic properties often leading to outside space. The 2 doors meet in the middle with the left-hand door hinging on the left and the right-hand door hinging on the right. The 2 doors are commonly named the “Active” door and the “Passive” door. The active door is the door that opens and closes regularly, and the passive door is seldom used.

The active door will contain a multipoint door lock with shoot bolts securing the door to the top and/or bottom of the door frame. The active door can be locked the same way a normal multipoint door lock can be. Lifting the handle will throw the locking points and a turn of the key will keep the mechanism in a locked state. When the locking points are engaged, rather than entering the door frame they enter the passive door.

The passive door may simply contain keeps for the active door’s locking points and flush bolts to secure it to the top and bottom of the door frame. Alternatively, you might find the passive door has a slave lock installed.
A slave lock looks similar to a multipoint door lock except the centre gearbox doesn’t have any latch or deadbolt and the faceplate doesn’t have any locking points to throw. Sometime the slave locks will have holes in the faceplate that act as keeps to match the position of the Active multipoints locking points. The only locking points the slave lock will operate are its top and bottom shoot bolts.
If the passive door contains a slave lock; it can also be locked via a euro cylinder. A lift of the handle will engage the top and bottom shoot bolts and a turn of the key will keep the shoot bolts in a locked state. A slave lock is a more secure way to lock the passive door.


At Duffells we stock and supply our trade customers with ERA French door locks for rebated timber French doors, and plain meeting style timber / composite doors:

ERA French door locks for rebated timber doors
Era French door locks for plain meeting style timber / composite doors