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A Beginners Guide to Panic Hardware

Tuesday, 20 August 2019
A Beginners Guide to Panic Hardware

Panic hardware is designed to provide a fast and safe exit from a building in an emergency. There are various types with different standards for different buildings.Here are some things you should know before choosing a suitable product for your exit door.

Push Pads

All push pads are British Standard BS EN179. This means they are designed to be used in emergency situations where people are familiar with the emergency exit and its hardware and therefore, a panic situation is less likely to develop.

Push pads are suitable for a building where there is a maximum of 60 people, such as a place of work where the employees know the escape route and are familiar with the building. They can consist of just the push pad itself or with varying extra locking points such as shoot bolts or latches.

Push Bar

All push bars are British Standard BS EN1125. They are designed to be used in emergency situations where people are not familiar with the emergency exit and its hardware and therefore, more likely to panic.

Push bars are suitable for buildings when the number of people exceeds 60. This tends to be more public places like schools, shopping centres, cinemas etc., emphasising a safe exit rather than security.

Push bars can consist of just the bar itself or with various locking points such as shoot bolts or latches.

Touch Bar

Touch bars are also British Standard BS EN1125 and can be used in all the same places as a push bar for the same reasons. The main difference between a touch bar and a panic bar is that the touch bar doesn’t swing away from the door on release preventing the risk of people getting their arms caught or trapped behind the bar in an emergency situation.

2-Point Panic Hardware

2-point panic hardware is when the main part of the bar or pad doesn’t have a latch but has bars that extend to the floor and the top of the frame with locking points on them. These locking points can consist of shoot bolts, horizontal latches and vertical latches.

3-Point Panic Hardware

3-point panic hardware also has bars that extend to the floor and top frame with locking points on them, the only difference is the third locking point. The third locking point for these is the latch on the main body of the bar or pad. The other two locking points will generally consist of shoot bolts, vertical latches or horizontal latches.

Outside Access Device

Whilst these aren’t necessarily needed, a lot of building do have them as a way of entering the building from outside through a fire exit.

Whilst there are a few different types, some with keypads and some that use a standard cylinder but the best ones to use are the same brand as your push bar or pad as they are designed to be used with specific models.

Now that you know a bit more about panic hardware, why not take a look at our range…

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